A cup of tea and a tea packet with text "Benefits of Green Tea"

There’s something comforting about enjoying a warm cup of tea. What’s even better is choosing green tea and reaping the health benefits that come with it.

Green tea is made from Camellia sinensis leaves and is widely used for a beverage, which has a stimulant effect due to caffeine. Green tea is made from leaves steamed and dried, while black tea leaves are withered, rolled, fermented and dried. It is often combined with flavor additives such as jasmine flowers, orange peels and tropical fruits.

Green tea boasts of a variety of health benefits in addition to being a delicious and popular drink. Here are just a few of benefits from drinking green tea.

Heart Health – According to a study published in “Current Medicinal Chemistry”, Pon Velayutham and colleagues found flavonoids in green tea can help prevent oxidation of LDL (bad) cholesterol and reduce blood clotting as well as help lower blood pressure.

Weight Loss – Green tea is thought to aid weight loss by boosting the body’s metabolism to be more efficient. Regularly exercising and eating a healthy diet are highly effective weight loss strategies. Replacing sodas and sugary drinks with a cup of green tea may help increase positive results.

Blood Sugar – Keeping blood sugar at a reasonable level can be difficult. Green tea may help manage glycemic loads and manage blood sugar levels. In a study performed in Japan, people consumed six or more cups a day saw a stunning 33% percent risk reduction of developing Type 2 diabetes.

Pro Tip: Ideal temperature for steeping green tea is between 160-180 F. Boiling the water to hot can damage the tea leaves, causing it to taste bitter.

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Sources:

Duke, James A. “Camellia sinensis (L.) Kuntze” Handbook of Energy Crops, 1983, https://hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/duke_energy/Camellia_sinensis.html

Pon Velayutham, Anandh Babu, and Dongmin Liu. “Green tea catechins and cardiovascular health: an update.” Current Medicinal Chemistry vol. 15,18 (2008): 1840-50. doi:10.2174/092986708785132979

Kim, Hyun Min, and Jaetaek Kim. “The effects of green tea on obesity and type 2 diabetes.” Diabetes & metabolism journal vol. 37,3 (2013): 173-5. doi:10.4093/dmj.2013.37.3.173 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3689013/

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